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Thread: Chain Size

  1. #1
    MoJo|oJoM
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    Chain Size

    I'm sizing a new chain, I'm using a new cassette with a 34, the old chain was for a 32. I'm using the formula on the Park website and am curious how important the chainstay measurement is. Here's the quote:
    Begin by counting the number of teeth on the largest front sprocket and largest rear. These numbers are often printed right on the sprockets and cogs. Next, measure the distance between the middle of the crankarm bolt to the rear axle. This is also the chain stay length. Measure to the closest 1/8, and convert this to decimal form. A simple chart below will assist this conversion.
    So, do you measure to the front of the rear axle or to the middle, ot the rear? There is good 1/2" difference depending on where the measurement is taken. Does it really matter, well it makes the chain length jump 1" up or down depending on what I enter into the formula.

    Here's the link to the entire aritcle:
    http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/...inlength.shtml

  2. #2
    mOjO cHaUfuRr toonces's Avatar
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    Measurements are usually center-to-center. Unless you're Rocky Mountain and measure outside edge to outside edge and in millimeters no less

  3. #3
    try explaining the internet to a bum!
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    data, i've tried that and that's one problem that comes up from time to time.

    all of the factors are the ratios on the cassette, the ratios on the crankset, the chainstay length, the length of the der cage (short, med, long....and now with 2003 super long) and the number of teeth on the pulleys (10t vs 11).

    anyway, so long as the der cage is perpendicular to the chain stay (or close enough when in the middle chainring and largest cog) you're ok.

    in the case of this photo it's a bit pitched forward but it's also one link short so........new chain on the way.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by carlos; 10-28-2002 at 10:19 PM.

  4. #4
    Mojo that juggles them rings! mgruene's Avatar
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    Data,
    Why worry you only wear out the small ring.heheheheheh
    sorry, but carlito is right as usual.
    Two wrongs don't make a right but three lefts do?!?!?!?!?!?

  5. #5
    try explaining the internet to a bum!
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    data, that is one complicated way to measure chain length.

    i sent that to a few mechs and i'll post their responces.

    it seems a bit much work with the charts and decimal conversion.

    the very first method works well too. shift the chain to the smallest chainring and smallest cog and make sure the guide pulley (upper pulley) doesn't touch the chain.

    with some crankset and cassette combos it may, so, check the chain's perpendicularity (is that even a word????) in the midddle chain ring and largest cog.

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