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Thread: Making a SS

  1. #1
    Mojo Model of Grace and Tact
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    Question Making a SS

    I've got a very light '99 Trek 8000 MTB frame hanging in the garage and was thinking about (baaaa baaaaa) making a singlespeed out of it.

    What drive train parts do I need to but the make this happen?

    -Scary
    Quote Originally Posted by bartman View Post
    you bunch of coon lovers will do anything possible to steal this election..I guess that's par for the course from a group of people who make up 15% of general population and 55% of the prison population. the last thing we need is a black muslim gang bangin crack head in the whitehouse...soon to be change to the sambo house..

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    One who wanders Singlespeedster's Avatar
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    Cassette spacers.*
    Shorter chainring bolts.
    Some sort of chain tensioner (old derailleur being sovereign in most non-horizontal dropout applications).

    That is really about it.

    If you want to really throw yourself at the project, other nice things to have are longer cranks and a wider handlebar. Levers are a good thing.

    A
    Usually available at the LBS, but orderingthem may be worth it if you can secure them in different thicknesses. Conversion buildups live and die by chainline, the different thicknesses will allow you to dial in the chainline pretty precisely.
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    also, a rigid fork.


    Surly makes a singulator tensioner which is nice...and......SRAM makes an SS specific chain. don't skip on a chain.

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    Mojo Model of Grace and Tact
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    Thanks for the info. Got any links that have rigid forks and reviews?

    Thanks -Scary
    Quote Originally Posted by bartman View Post
    you bunch of coon lovers will do anything possible to steal this election..I guess that's par for the course from a group of people who make up 15% of general population and 55% of the prison population. the last thing we need is a black muslim gang bangin crack head in the whitehouse...soon to be change to the sambo house..

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    only small builders like www.ifbikes.com www.viciouscycles.com www.vanillabicycles.com still make steel rigid forks.

    there is one listing on MTBR.com.


    See the fur fly at MTBR.com!!!
    -------------------------------------

    also check out the Single Speed forum on MTBR if you have specific questions.

    SS


    most important is that you get a rigid fork that is suspension corrected....meanign that when measured from the center of the drop outs to the base of the crown....the fork meassures no less than 400mm. any less and the bike will get twitchy. also, most forks that are built these days can be build with a specific length.

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    boring the Inbred's Avatar
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    both On-One and Planet X sell rigid forks.

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    One who wanders Singlespeedster's Avatar
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    Rigid fork.

    Surly.

    Cheap. Works. Holds up to a 2.7.

    A
    Fear knocked on the door, Faith answered, No one was there.

    "This old bag of bones ain't really me; there's a lot more standing here than what you see." ~~Guy Clark

    Everything is closer than you think, yet, you've never seen everything.

    Confused? Intrigued? Outraged? Get help at: http://www.anthonysloan.com

    What if you took a picture every day?

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    violent femme been_jammin's Avatar
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    Lightbulb fastest way to get started ss-ing

    set the drivetrain on your current ride to middle and about 3rd smallest on an 8/4 on a 9... better to count teeth... you want the classic ss ratio 2:1... as in 32 in the front and 16 out back...
    next, pedal and refrain from shifting

    after pretending to ss in this manner, then
    1. lose the front derailleur, shifter and cable
    2. lose the rear shifter
    3. take the rear der cable, cut it to about 6 in and run it backwards thru the rear der... you can use it to fine tune a chainline by turning the barrel adjuster on the mech itself
    4. take out a bunch of unecessary chain links
    5. remove the roadie and granny rings; you may need shorter chainring bolts, or the ones for the granny might work
    6. you can keep running your whole cassette with this setup but that's wasteful weightwise and you will want to shave off a cassette's amount of weight since you're spinning just one gear
    7. go to your favorite LBS and see how much goodwill you've built up... old worthless cassettes have spacers between the cogs which are exactly what you need... metal ones are better than plastic; even if no LBS knows you this part will be less than $7.50
    8. wide bars are better, lose the bar ends - you want the longer levers of getting the grips out wide and, again, shave weight
    9. fat tires are a must...
    10. rigid front fork is the most efficient and you'll look so much cooler (and badass as you smoke a geared up poser)... about 420mm from crown race to dropouts is the same as an 80mm travel sussy when the boinger is compressed by your weight while riding... you're going faster on the ups and a tad slower on the downs and the efficiency on the climbs and flats is more valuable than the comfort... anyway, your arms and legs have more than 100mm of travel in them and you have to carry that wt already
    11. while longer cranks help a little when climbing, your spin will suffer... ss racers almost all ride regular length (175mm for the average Joe) cranks... your standing during most of the climbs anyway

    do yourself a favor - take all necessary tools on the first couple rides, including a chaintool... trust me

    a review: the more weight you take off, the more you'll love this bike... fat tires with low pressure and big grips are your friends... ride smooth, with cleaner lines and as little braking as possible... the mo' will lead to flow... bring tools and a spare tube, it's still mtb'ing
    what goes up, gets to come back down

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    been_jammin posted "you're going faster on the ups and a tad slower on the downs and the efficiency on the climbs and flats is more valuable than the comfort... anyway, your arms and legs have more than 100mm of travel in them and you have to carry that weight already"

    he speaks the truth!

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    Mojo Road Warrior TXRAiDR's Avatar
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    So with that said, I too want to convert a road bike to a SS. It's a 1980's Schwinn Super Le Tour 12.2. Got the original BB in it still and overhauled it. I'm thinking of using a Suzue flip-flop hub spaced out to 126mm, and then some Sunigo MTB cranks with the 44 tooth big ring only. IS that too big a gear to push on an SS? I'm thinking I could use the middle ring (I think it's a 32).
    "As long as I breathe, I attack"-Bernard Hinault
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    boring the Inbred's Avatar
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    i beleive 44:16 to be the preferred roadie ratio

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    Talking

    The conversion took place tonight. Road tests will commence on Sunday... I started w/ 32/14 gearing.
    Quote Originally Posted by bartman View Post
    you bunch of coon lovers will do anything possible to steal this election..I guess that's par for the course from a group of people who make up 15% of general population and 55% of the prison population. the last thing we need is a black muslim gang bangin crack head in the whitehouse...soon to be change to the sambo house..

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    MoJo Mother Superior SWORKZ's Avatar
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    Originally posted by TXRAiDR
    So with that said, I too want to convert a road bike to a SS. It's a 1980's Schwinn Super Le Tour 12.2. Got the original BB in it still and overhauled it. I'm thinking of using a Suzue flip-flop hub spaced out to 126mm, and then some Sunigo MTB cranks with the 44 tooth big ring only. IS that too big a gear to push on an SS? I'm thinking I could use the middle ring (I think it's a 32).
    First, if you are going to buy a new hub, just get a fixed gear for the sake of training and having fun. Secondly, a 44 tooth ring should be about perfect for road riding, a 32 will be way to easy. A 32:16 ratio is ideal for MTB single speeding,but for the road, you will spin out way too fast. If 44 is to hard try a 42 or maybe a 40.

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