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Thread: Frame prepping; components

  1. #1
    Mojo Road Warrior TXRAiDR's Avatar
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    Frame prepping; components

    I'd like a little more insight on when to prep a frame and when to not. By prepping I mean having the BB faced and chased, and having the head tube done the same (except for the chasing), and if it's a good idea to go ahead and chase all other threads on the bike (water bottle bosses, RD, rack eyelets if they're going to be used, etc).

    What about forks? I guess I've been lucky with the ones I've gotten, in that they've all accepted the crown race without having to be trimmed down or using a different crown race. Is there a certain "protocol" for prepping frames and components?
    "As long as I breathe, I attack"-Bernard Hinault
    I've got more skill on two wheels than the majority of people have on two legs.

  2. #2
    try explaining the internet to a bum!
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    carlos's Avatar
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    i think if there is doubt as to the frames quality (high end or low) and how much manufaturing time gets put into assembly and alignment, you should have all that (BB and headset reaming/chasing and facing) done.

    if it's, say, and old Colnago Master Light. it's a really nice bike and probably has everything in good order.

    also, if using threadless stems, be sure to have them faced if needed. sometime when you get a powder coated stem, the piant wacks out the tureness of the stem. so in that case, some shops will face the stem.

    as for bottle mounts and fork eyelets, if there is paint on them you're ok. if there isn't paint and the bike wasnt used for touring and only had, say, fenders on it. you're ok. if it was used for touring. you're ok. if it was used to travel across the US or Europe, consider having the mounts chased.

    if it's a nice frame (something that costs more than say, $700 retail, you're sure to get some good alignment jobs.

    if it was less thanthat or less than that as a WHOLE bike, consider the facing, chasing, and reaming.

    as s rule of thumb.....never, ever, trim down a steerer to accept a tight headset race. especially if it's done on a lathe. the deep sharp cuts that are made into the metal become stress risers and eventually can lead to failure of the steerer. and if you're doing 30 mhp on a road bike.....it's not going to look good.

    if the race is so tight that it won't slide on with the use of a 10 oz steel hammer.....call up the fork manufacturer and ask them what the diameter at teh base of the steerer should be...then swing by a shop and set a caliper to the steerer and see if it m,atches up. if not, let them know and see about getting the fork swapped.

    mods to steerers are dangerous at best. only thing that should ever be done to a steerer is to take a hack saw to it. beyond that....it's sketchy.

  3. #3
    Mojo Road Warrior TXRAiDR's Avatar
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    Thanks Carlos. I'm getting that TREK done up because for some reason, I just had a wierd feeling about it.
    "As long as I breathe, I attack"-Bernard Hinault
    I've got more skill on two wheels than the majority of people have on two legs.

  4. #4
    try explaining the internet to a bum!
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    carlos's Avatar
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    no prob...while they're at it.....you can get them to check the frame for alignment...take a second or two but worth it.

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