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Thread: post whores lookie hea

  1. #21
    Mojo Mofo Tex Mex's Avatar
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  4. #24
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    Originally posted by Tex Mex
    Probably Weaver.
    Didn't see him on page one surprisingly.
    Where's the Mojo?

  5. #25
    MoJo Mother Superior pak ratt's Avatar
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    The successful implementation of change within any working environment is dependent on how the company executes the strategic plan. In today’s business climate, the most successful businesses are those that are adaptable to change and are in a continuous learning mode. Learning organizations employ individuals that are continuously seeking new knowledge. These organizations have strong communication channels, continuously transfer new information throughout the organization and most importantly change their behaviors based on new insights. In this project we partnered with Sears CCN to develop a learning organization.. “Learning Organizations strive to reduce structural, process, and interpersonal barriers to the sharing of information, ideas, and knowledge among organizational members.” (McShane, & Glinow, 2001, p.154). It is always a challenge to implement successful change within any organization for a multitude of reasons. However, to transition an organization into a learning organization is a more difficult task then implementing a single change to a process. To evolve into a learning organization means a complete paradigm shift. It is critical to have a plan and execute it with precision, in order to remain competitive in today’s business world. “In fact, both researchers and practicing managers agree that an organization’s capability to learn is a key strategic weapon. It thus is important for organizations to enhance and nurture their capability to learn.” (McShane, & Glinow, 2001, p.152).
    One of the key failures of this program was a lack of metric measurements before and after the implementation. This did not allow for the project to be fully justified in the end and is currently under constant revision under various project names. Currently there are five other projects acting independent of this initiative.
    Because personality development is the product of heredity, environment, and the interaction between the two, each individual is more or less differentiated from every other. Values, attitudes, interests, abilities, experiences, and expectations display a wide range of variation in any population. Differences in these variables result in great differences in potential and actual behavior. Therefore, the initial information to be gathered resides in the building blocks of team behavior.
    The building blocks of social organization are the primer focus in implementing the tenets of the learning organization at Sears. The project identified building blocks or elements of team behavior are broken down in the following: individual and group objectives, collective activities, interaction, sentiments, norms, roles, and structure.
    In the beginning of this project it was discovered that in formal teams there tended to be an identity or high compatibility of individual and team objectives. Interpersonal behavioral characteristics were critical in team development and status. Sentiments evolved from team members working and knowing each other over a period of time. What developed here was positive and negative feelings towards the change. Traditionally, in the long run, sentiments tend to become positive in the informal team (Zander, 1971). Positive sentiments become dominant for a number of reasons. One of these is that if one team member is uncongenial with others, he may elect to leave. Those who remain will tend to be, or become, more nearly alike. One of the ways in which people become more nearly alike is with respect to values, attitudes, and behavior. Standards or ideals of value, attitude, and behavior- called norms- are another outcome of the persisting interaction of individuals. As they interact, members of the group reach and maintain consensus on preferred values, attitudes, and behavior. Sentiments and norms are the result of interaction. As persons in a team interact, they develop more positive sentiments. In turn, the existence of positive sentiments increases the rate of interaction. Through interaction team members’ specific roles are defined. The pattern of routine interaction between and among team members is based upon task and leader-follower roles, which are necessary to accomplish team objectives.
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  6. #26
    MoJo Mother Superior pak ratt's Avatar
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    When an organization, such as Morgan Stanley, is implementing a change to the workplace, it is important to acknowledge that employees will be resistant to change. It is a natural reaction to resist change to our jobs, workplace and environment. We are creatures of habit and most of us do not like to be forced out of our comfort zone. According to Tom Peters, “we’re trying to cope with the biggest economic change in two centuries, that truth is self evident. But what does that mean to you? It means that to be scared out of your senses is sensible. To be comfortable is suicidal.”
    There have been many studies on why people resist change; most have confirmed that when people are not involved from the beginning they are more resistant to the change then those that have been allowed to participate. When implementing a dramatic change, such as the transition to a learning organization culture, resistance should be expected. As individuals become confident in their ability to do their jobs successfully, they may become less inclined to take on new leanings. By the implementation of a learning organization, they will never be at that same comfort level that they previously were.
    There are different ways for individuals to resist change. Some may be passive in their actions such as agreeing to making the change, and yet not following through with their actions. Some may become disengaged with the process and become unavailable or disinterested in the conversations and discussions. There are people who will withhold information that is key to success, in an attempt to derail the process.
    Another way for employees to resist change is by being active in their resistance. They may be distracting in meetings, and even disruptive. They may challenge the new way and defend the old, making excuses why the old way should not be changed and why the new way will never work.
    According to McShane, & Glinow, (2001) there are ten top reasons that people resist change.
    1. “An individual’s predisposition toward change
    2. Surprise and fear of the unknown
    3. Climate of mistrust
    4. Fear of failure
    5. Loss of status and/or job security
    6. Peer pressure
    7. Disruption of cultural traditions and/or group relationships
    8. Personality conflicts
    9. Lack of tact and/or poor timing
    10. Non-reinforcing reward system” (2001, p.148 - 150).
    An organization must be aware of these reasons that resistance will happen. If they initially address these concerns up front there will be a greater likelihood of a successful implementation. An organization must be ready for change, its’ people must be ready and committed in order for a smooth, successful transition.
    Upon implementation it is natural to expect certain changes in organizational culture. Including these changes and the resistance noted above in the process of creating a learning organization, will be key to the success of the program. “A learning organization is one that proactively creates, acquires, and transfers knowledge and that changes its behavior on the basis of new knowledge and insights” (McShane, & Glinow, 2001, pg. 154). The whole organizational structure must change to accommodate this new way of doing business. “Companies that can’t change in this new environment can’t play in this new economy” (Reich, 2000, p.140).
    Individuals and organizations have a natural tendency to avoid and resist learning. This resistance will manifest itself in many ways throughout the culture of the organization. The focus on systems rather than the fragmented methods in use today, implementing collaboration instead of competition, and teaching employees to be proactive instead of reactive, will be the greatest challenges. “Overcoming these problems requires a fundamental shift in how we view the world” (McShane, & Glinow, 2001, p. 158).
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  7. #27
    MoJo Mother Superior pak ratt's Avatar
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    The relationship between employees and managers will have to take on a new meaning in the learning organization. Managers must be able to lead the employees into unknown waters and make them feel safe in their new environment. Leadership is crucial, “Leaders can create an organizational culture that promotes systems thinking over fragmentations, collaboration and cooperation over competition, and innovation and proaction over reactivity. Leaders must, however, adopt new roles and associated activities to create a learning organization” (McShane, & Glinow, 2001, p. 159). Employees will have to come to see their managers as teachers, mentors, and guides rather than the boss. This will not be an easy transition for either group to make.
    In order to monitor the successful implementation of our initiatives we will study both tangible and intangible benefits. Tangible benefits will include how the change drivers result in reduction in cost and revenue growth. Specific numbers however will not be discussed. Since intangible benefits can only be surmised prior to the interdiction, we cannot predict the benefits however, based on prior experience we can expect to see benefits such as employee stress reduction, increased attendance, decreased turnover, higher job satisfaction, and a better overall work climate.
    The data that we will need to look at should objectively support the change initiative and be credible with the management. It will also be important that we look specifically to data that is timely, in the sense that it does not lag far behind the interdiction process. Once data is identified, we will look at the data for a one-year prior, during the interdiction, and sixty days after. A further study will be completed one-year post to capture seasonal trends.
    A specific tool that our change initiative will use is the Benefit-Cost Ratio (BCR). The BCR is one of the oldest methods and widely recognized tools for evaluating change initiatives. (Phillips, 2000). This method will provide leadership a clear metric to work with. The BCR compares the annual economic benefit of the interdiction to the cost of the interdiction. If the BCR ratio equals 1 or 1:1, it reflects that the initiative cost equals the cost of the initiative. If the ratio is 2 or 2:1, it indicates that for each dollar spent in the intervention resulted in two dollars are returned.
    Throughout this change intervention we should remain mindful of the scope of the project. As with many projects the scope can change and be redefined. Before this intervention can be successful process owners and stakeholders need to agree on the project scope, expected outcomes and the implementation timing. Frame of the intervention, timing of specific steps, access to stakeholders, and functional areas for intervention coverage all need to be assessed and addressed during the intervention as well as pre and post intervention.
    Our task force will be challenged throughout the implementation of a learning organization culture change. If we are able to successfully execute our strategic plan and redefine the process we will have created a paradigm shift. We are aware that change happens over time, therefore we will need to evaluate the success of the implementation throughout the entire process.
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  8. #28
    Mojo Mofo Tex Mex's Avatar
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    Gee, Skratt, you got a lot of nothing to say.
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  9. #29
    MoJo Mother Superior pak ratt's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Tex Mex
    Gee, Skratt, you got a lot of nothing to say.
    A reflection of the modern elitist educational system....

    I feel like a true Austinite!!!!
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  10. #30
    HAVE HOOD? WILL POOP!
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    Re: post whores lookie hea

    Originally posted by Mr. Z
    chief's sexual persuasion

    ???


    u mean u don't like the little man in the boat???

  11. #31
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    holy shit! It's only been like 10 minutes and we are on the second page!

    weeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
    "It's all fun and games 'til someone gets a penis in the eye"
    E. B.

    Ligustrum must die.

  12. #32
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    eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!
    "It's all fun and games 'til someone gets a penis in the eye"
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    Ligustrum must die.

  13. #33
    Not a Bad Guy Afterall Harorider's Avatar
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    i see how it is!! do this while im gone!

  14. #34
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    I miss the "old weeg". Now there was a post whore.
    "It's all fun and games 'til someone gets a penis in the eye"
    E. B.

    Ligustrum must die.

  15. #35
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    of course, there are other post whores, but I don't miss them.
    "It's all fun and games 'til someone gets a penis in the eye"
    E. B.

    Ligustrum must die.

  16. #36
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    which means they shouldn't post here without my expressed written permission.
    "It's all fun and games 'til someone gets a penis in the eye"
    E. B.

    Ligustrum must die.

  17. #37
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    Well, it's MY thread, right?
    "It's all fun and games 'til someone gets a penis in the eye"
    E. B.

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  18. #38
    MoJo Mother Superior pak ratt's Avatar
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    Most people want to do a good job. At the same time, people with different needs are motivated differently. People who require a high need for achievement look for ways to prosper and seek to excel. They tend to avoid low-risk that do not challenge them or benefit their growth process and high-risk situations that could lead to their demise. High achievers avoid low-risk situations because the easy win is not a genuine achievement. In high-risk opportunities, achievers see the outcome as one of chance- rolling the dice- rather than success by effort. Developing a staff of high performance personnel and mentoring achievers requires regular feedback in order for them to monitor the progress of their own success. One of the challenges in developing a well trained and motivated staff of high achievers is that they prefer to work alone or with other high achievers, or to be left alone and work by themselves.
    Another challenge for a leader in developing this high performance team is that there is a need for harmonious relationships with other people. When we review the feedback that was accumulated in this study we find that this was an area of concern. In a team where production is the by-product, the need to feel accepted by other people is important. Some team members tend to conform to the norms of their work group. If the norm is doing a good job, then individuals who require high affiliation prefer work or task that provides significant personal interaction. A leader could find suitable places for the individual to wok, while still contributing to overall productivity or profit. People who enjoy personal interaction perform well in customer service and customer situations.
    Another dynamic on a productive team is the need to understand the power structure. An employee’s need for power can be either personal or institutional. Those who need personal power want to lead, guide, and direct others. This need often is important, however too often perceived as undesirable. Persons who need institutional power or social power feel the need to organize the efforts of other individuals to move goals of the organization forward. People with a high need for institutional power tend to be more effective at driving projects that directly effect metrics than those with a high need for personal power.
    All corporate interdictions are an investment. Every client looks for the benefits of the interdiction. For our initiative we will look at tangible and intangible benefits of driving motivation. Tangible benefits can include how the change in motivation results in reduction in cost and increase in revenue growth. Motivation is often associated with the intangible benefits but we can only surmise the changes of increased motivation prior to the interdiction. Because of prior experience, we can expect to see benefits such as employee stress reduction, increased attendance, decreased turnover, higher job satisfaction, and a better overall work climate.
    Life is not a problem to be solved- it is an adventure to be lived!

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  19. #39
    MoJo Mother Superior pak ratt's Avatar
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    Originally posted by pak ratt
    Most people want to do a good job. At the same time, people with different needs are motivated differently. People who require a high need for achievement look for ways to prosper and seek to excel. They tend to avoid low-risk that do not challenge them or benefit their growth process and high-risk situations that could lead to their demise. High achievers avoid low-risk situations because the easy win is not a genuine achievement. In high-risk opportunities, achievers see the outcome as one of chance- rolling the dice- rather than success by effort. Developing a staff of high performance personnel and mentoring achievers requires regular feedback in order for them to monitor the progress of their own success. One of the challenges in developing a well trained and motivated staff of high achievers is that they prefer to work alone or with other high achievers, or to be left alone and work by themselves.
    Another challenge for a leader in developing this high performance team is that there is a need for harmonious relationships with other people. When we review the feedback that was accumulated in this study we find that this was an area of concern. In a team where production is the by-product, the need to feel accepted by other people is important. Some team members tend to conform to the norms of their work group. If the norm is doing a good job, then individuals who require high affiliation prefer work or task that provides significant personal interaction. A leader could find suitable places for the individual to wok, while still contributing to overall productivity or profit. People who enjoy personal interaction perform well in customer service and customer situations.
    Another dynamic on a productive team is the need to understand the power structure. An employee’s need for power can be either personal or institutional. Those who need personal power want to lead, guide, and direct others. This need often is important, however too often perceived as undesirable. Persons who need institutional power or social power feel the need to organize the efforts of other individuals to move goals of the organization forward. People with a high need for institutional power tend to be more effective at driving projects that directly effect metrics than those with a high need for personal power.
    All corporate interdictions are an investment. Every client looks for the benefits of the interdiction. For our initiative we will look at tangible and intangible benefits of driving motivation. Tangible benefits can include how the change in motivation results in reduction in cost and increase in revenue growth. Motivation is often associated with the intangible benefits but we can only surmise the changes of increased motivation prior to the interdiction. Because of prior experience, we can expect to see benefits such as employee stress reduction, increased attendance, decreased turnover, higher job satisfaction, and a better overall work climate.
    The data that we will need to look at should objectively support the initiative and be credible with the in-place management. During the interdiction, data that is easy to gather, performance metrics and quantified results that are common to the organization will be used. It will also be important that we look specifically to data that is timely, in the sense that it does not lag far behind the interdiction process. Once data is identified, we will look at the data for one- year prior, during the interdiction, and sixty days after. I feel that this motivation drive should see results in the first sixty days. A further study will be completed one- year post to capture seasonal trends.
    A specific tool that our change initiative will use is the Benefit-Cost Ratio (BCR). The BCR is one of the oldest methods and widely recognized tools for evaluating change initiatives. Phillips (2000). This method will provide leadership responsible for over-seeing change management initiatives a clear metric to work with. The BCR is compares the annual economic benefit of the interdiction to the cost of the interdiction. If the BCR ratio equals 1 or 1:1, it reflects that the initiative cost equals the cost of the initiative. If the ratio is 2 or 2:1, it indicates that for each dollar spent in the intervention resulted in two dollars are returned. When written out the formula looks like this:

    Interdiction Benefits/Interdiction Cost= BCR

    Again, through further studies of the Sears.Com organization we will specifically “find and fix” targets of opportunity. We are willing to point out that there could be consequences for not engaging in the motivational change initiatives. As a team we should be ready to identify and isolate targets of opportunity such as loss of morale, loss of revenue, compliance and legal issues, and the ability to drive profitable revenue and gain new business.
    Life is not a problem to be solved- it is an adventure to be lived!

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  20. #40
    MoJo Mother Superior pak ratt's Avatar
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    Originally posted by pak ratt
    The data that we will need to look at should objectively support the initiative and be credible with the in-place management. During the interdiction, data that is easy to gather, performance metrics and quantified results that are common to the organization will be used. It will also be important that we look specifically to data that is timely, in the sense that it does not lag far behind the interdiction process. Once data is identified, we will look at the data for one- year prior, during the interdiction, and sixty days after. I feel that this motivation drive should see results in the first sixty days. A further study will be completed one- year post to capture seasonal trends.
    A specific tool that our change initiative will use is the Benefit-Cost Ratio (BCR). The BCR is one of the oldest methods and widely recognized tools for evaluating change initiatives. Phillips (2000). This method will provide leadership responsible for over-seeing change management initiatives a clear metric to work with. The BCR is compares the annual economic benefit of the interdiction to the cost of the interdiction. If the BCR ratio equals 1 or 1:1, it reflects that the initiative cost equals the cost of the initiative. If the ratio is 2 or 2:1, it indicates that for each dollar spent in the intervention resulted in two dollars are returned. When written out the formula looks like this:

    Interdiction Benefits/Interdiction Cost= BCR

    Again, through further studies of the Sears.Com organization we will specifically “find and fix” targets of opportunity. We are willing to point out that there could be consequences for not engaging in the motivational change initiatives. As a team we should be ready to identify and isolate targets of opportunity such as loss of morale, loss of revenue, compliance and legal issues, and the ability to drive profitable revenue and gain new business.

    Sears, Roebuck & Company is one of the great success stories in American commerce. Richard Sears started selling pocket watches in rural and suburban areas. Later, he developed the ideas of selling goods by mail order and repair for the products he sold. Through mail order he could take a host of new products to populations cut off from big city stores. He was also able to repair the items that he sold, still mainly watches through the partnership with Roebuck. The famous Sears catalog became a byword for reliability and quality and remained a mainstay of American culture until the late 1980’s. In the 1920s, the company began opening stores to back up the catalog business. The stores proved every bit as successful.
    As many large companies recognize, the businesses need a code of ethics and a highly practical resource that is designed particularly for leaders and managers, those people charged to ensure ethical practices in Sears. Most senior and junior managers in Sears are truly concerned about doing what is right. Within the culture, there is a sense of morality about business, tempered with the pragmatic, that says, "What we do serves society; business must do some good in the grand scheme of things." I am not at all sure how this culture has developed, but I see its effects each day. Since my employment began at Sears I have attended local and national company seminars, read monthly updates, receive diversity briefings on a regular basis, and have had the opportunity to support diversity functions such as “Polynesian Awareness Week”. Sears has taken a great effort in its managerial training courses, Team Manager School and Leadership By Results, to train its leaders in working with diverse cultures, business ethics, and equal opportunity. Managers are trained to know and follow applicable law, report and correct violations, and to set the tone for a compliant corporate culture. Furthermore, managers are also taught that by not complying with the letter and spirit of established laws, the company risks losing trust among its customers, suppliers, investors, and most importantly, employees. They are familiarized with federal laws and company policy and by ignoring or violating them there is a risk of suffering corporate and individual criminal liability, paying retribution through civil fines and money damages, drawing adverse publicity, and the disruption of business.

    Sears recognizes that human dignity relates to the sacredness or value of each person as an end, not simply as the means to the fulfillment of other’s purposes or even majority prescription. For this reason Sears has invested a great deal of effort in its compliance officers. A Sears compliance officers stand at the crossroads between auditing, internal control and management's legal responsibilities, and is to some extent the guardian of the companies code of conduct. The compliance officer acts completely independently and his/her role is to supply the organization’s top management with all the necessary information on whether their decisions comply with the law, the professional rules and regulations and with the internal directives or with those of the regulatory authorities. Through the compliance office, Sears managers are guided through the questions of legality of decisions, is it within company beliefs and policies, is it right, fair and appropriate, and would the manager want everyone to know about it? Many managers even find themselves asking how they feel about themselves when faced with dilemmas and decisions.

    Like many corporations, Sears has established Codes of Conduct for managers and employees to follow. The Code of Conduct describes the commitment of the company to a set of high ethical standards. It is required that all managers become familiar with these guidelines and should apply them, in both letter and in spirit. In an organization as large as Sears, it is understandable why some employees believe the ethical guidelines exist to protect management rather than promote ethical behavior, ethics/compliance. In companies where this belief exist problems are more likely to occur. The key factor in the success or failure of an ethics program is employees' perceptions of management's motivations for creating the program in the first place. Sears has worked to eliminate this belief. Through the MOC- My Opinion Counts annual survey Sears management seeks the feedback of close to 1 million employees and third party supporters. By getting employees involved in the feedback process Sears is able to address any culture or diversity issues that arise. Management is required by policy to find and fix targets of opportunity that are found to go against the code of conduct, policy, or common sense. This is an area where the compliance office helps leadership understand laws and policy that may often times seem obscure. Leadership must report findings and solutions within 90 days once they receive MOC feedback. This has helped Sears promote its diverse culture.

    Sears also seeks to bring diversity to its stakeholders and promote good corporate citizenship by training its managers about unethical behavior, especially when it comes to stock trading. Since the company’s stock and other securities are traded publicly on major exchanges and the market prices of these securities are based upon what the public knows about the company. Investors could gain an unfair advantage through inside, non-public information that could affect their decision to buy or sell securities. Trading on, or "tipping" others about material, non-public information about the company, its subsidiaries, vendors or licensees threatens the corporation’s integrity and may result in serious civil and criminal penalties for both individual associates and the company. “While accepting the legitimacy of trade secrets, businesses should recognize that sincerity, keeping of promises and transparency contribute not only to their own credibility and stability but also to the smoothness and efficiency of business transactions, particularly on the international level.” When investors make a buying decision, they should see that we are a company that is culturally diverse and proactive in supporting ethical behavior in all of its business transactions. We have worked hard to keep our company a compelling place to work; we understand the diversity of the consumer market because we have invested time and money to first understand the differences in those who work for us. By recognizing various cultures we have made our stores a compelling place to shop. Because of this we are a compelling place to invest.
    Life is not a problem to be solved- it is an adventure to be lived!

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