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Thread: Pink Floyd: The Dark Side of the Moon

  1. #1
    arrogance in the flesh Hello Kitty's Avatar
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    Pink Floyd: The Dark Side of the Moon



    The Dark Side of the Moon is Pink Floyd's eighth album and is probably the most influential album of the most influential Progressive Rock band. Pink Floyd had their first album released in 1967, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn , with Roger Waters on bass, Richard Wright on keyboards, Nick Mason on drums and Roger "Syd" Barrett on lead guitar and vocals. Although Barrett was already replaced during the recording of the second album by David Gilmour, he left a huge impression on the rest of the band, something that they never got rid of until the mid eighties when Waters left en Pink Floyd refreshed itself. In my opinion, one can roughly devide the history of Pink Floyd in three stages. The first period is from the start in '67 until about '71-'72, the psychedelic period, influenenced by the musical inheritance of Barrett. This ended with Obscured by Clouds, a much underestimated movie-soundtrack. Their second period is the period of Waters and massive albums, starting with Dark Side of the Moon and ending with The Wall (not considering The Final Cut ). The third period is the Gilmour period, with 2 studio albums, A Momentary Lapse of Reason and The Division Bell and 2 live albums. On the last live album, Pulse, the integral Dark Side of the Moon is featured. This stresses the importance that DSOTM, as the album is often acronymed, has to the band.


    A Piece for Assorted Lunatics
    DSOTM was not written completely in 1972/1973. The "oldest" track on the album is Us and Them, originally titled The Violence Sequence and written in 1969 by Wright for the openings-sequence of the movie Zabritskie Point. The director of the movie decided not to use this sequence... In 1970 Roger Waters worked with Ron Geesin on the soundtrack of the documentary The Body. One of their tracks is called Breathe. It is not hard to imagine which track this would eventually become! While recording their 1971 album Meddle, Waters writes a song about a "Lunatic on the Grass", called Dark Side of the Moon. Although this song is not used on Meddle, it becomes the basis of their next studio album, together with the above mentioned tracks. Waters proposed to link these songs with the general theme of "madness" and make that into their new album. The band loved the idea and thus DSOTM was born. Time and Money were the first tracks especially written for the project. Having laid down the general theme, the rest of the album is written remarkably quickly, in 6 weeks time. The first time that DSOTM is performed in 1972, it had the subtitle Piece for Assorted Lunatics. At that time, On the Run did not exists yet and instead a song called The Travel Sequence was performed. This almost 8 minutes long improvisation of Gilmour and Wright never appeared agian. Also there was a track called The Religion Sequence with Saucerfull of Secrets-like organ tunes that was featured instead of the not-yet-written Great Gig in the Sky. Since the RelSeq featured voices of priests and Pink Floyd did not want to offend people, they decided to rewrite and rename it to the Mortality Sequence, later called GGITS. Time was played much slower than on the final album. Since the band was told that another band, Medicine Head wanted to market an album with the same title, the suite was called Eclipse for a while. When it turned out that album was a flop, they changed the name back into DSOTM. With Alan Parsons as sound engeneer, the album was recorded and soundeffects were added. According to Gilmour "the role of Parsons in the whole process was not as big as he wants people to believe and we could have done the same job without him, but in general he is a fine chap."


    The Dark Side of the Moon
    The final album consist of 10 songs (not counting Breathe (Reprise) as a seperate song). Since I assume that everybody has at least once listened to this album, I will not describe the musical contents of the individual songs, but rather give some funny details and themes. The album opens with Speak to Me, a collage of soundeffects and themes of the rest of the album, thus providing DSOTM with an Ouverture. It has evolved from the opening of Echoes on the Live at Pompeď movie. Although album credits give Mason as composer, Waters claims (and Gilmour confirms it) that he has conceived this piece. Speak to Me is what Alan Parsons used to say at the start of the recording sessions to adjust the recording volume, hence the title.
    Breathe (in the air), sung by Gilmour but written by Waters, deals with the frustation of chasing empty goals in live. As mentioned before, the song evolved from the Music from the Body album by Waters and Geesin.
    On the Run had to be about paranoia. The band experimented with the EMS VCS#3, a brand new synthesyser they just purchased until they had the repetitive sound they wanted. In fact, the whole track including bass etc. was done on this machine, hardly without any overdubs!
    Time is about man's fixed habits and people waiting for their life to start. The tracks opens with a kakaphonia of clocks and bells, all recorded seperately by Alan Parsons in an antique store near the recording studios. The pace of the song has increased dramatically during its final recording with respect to the early versions, with Gilmour singing the fast parts and Wright the slow parts. It is followed by Breathe (reprise), put here due to the textual overlap of Breathe and Time.
    The Great Gig in the Sky was originally intended to be about how religion can drive people to insanity (The Religion Sequence), but later changed into the fear of dying (The Mortality Sequence), later renamed to TGGITS. The decision to add the vocals came only after the recording of the main track. The session vocalist Clare Torry was told only the theme of the song and improvised on it. The result is known....
    Money, about the pressure money can give in people's every day life, was almost finished when Waters brought it to the studio to let the others hear it. The band only added a middle part, and there it was. The most difficult parts were the soundeffects of a cashregister in 7/8, a masterpiece of Parsons and his tape-cutting-and-pasting abilities.
    Us and Them was written by Waters using Wright's 1969 The Violence Sequence. The song deals with three contradictions: rich and poor, employers and workcrew (illustrated by generals and dying soldiers) and "us" and "them" (the differences between individuals which lead to more general phenoma like racism). All the spoken sentences on the record are awnsers to (unheard) questions. In this case: "Have you ever been violent ?" and "were you right ?".
    Any Colour You Like, originally called Dave's Scat Section, is the only song on the album that goes back to Floyd's past of improvisation and is the only song not (co-)written by Waters. The title is due to a roady of the group who told them they could have it in "any colour you like" when asked to do something he didn't want to do. So in fact he told them they could let him do anything...
    Brain Damage, originally called "Dark Side of the Moon" is written by Waters when a feeling of nostalgia hits when picking material for the Relics album, and is originally about Barrett. For the album, the context is broadened to the person behind the facade that the outside world sees.
    Originally the suite ended after Brain Damage, but the group realised it needed a stronger ending. Therefore Waters wrote Eclipse, a song in the form of a summation using the image of the cold, dead moon eclipsing the warm, live giving sun, in this way summing up all the contrasts encountered in the album, bringing the album to its climax and ending. A true masterpiece had been created.


    After the Eclipse

    After the release of the album, Money was released as a single. The modest success of the single (13 in USA), caused a dramatic change in the type of audience for the Floyd. Before the Dark Side, people were quiet and listened to the music. Now, they scream for the hit-song and yell. Eventually, Waters will be so fed up with that, that he's going to write a new album about his reactions... but that is a different story. The Dark Side has been in the Billboard list for the total of 591 weeks and it is estimated that 1 in 4 British households owns a copy of the album, and 1 in 14 people in the USA. A total of over 35 million copies have been sold, stressing how deep the impact of the album has been and still is.


  2. #2
    arrogance in the flesh Hello Kitty's Avatar
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    Hmmmmm.... not many Floyd fans here but anyway...Pink Floyd DSOTM Triva Game

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    arrogance in the flesh Hello Kitty's Avatar
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    The story of "Pink Floyd

    Roger Keith (Syd) Barrett, 6 January, 1946
    George Roger Waters, 9 September, 1943
    Richard William Wright, 28 July, 1945
    Nicholas Berkeley Mason, 27 January, 1945
    David Jon Gilmour, 6 March, 1946

    About 1965, the Floyd-to-be formed as "Sigma 6." They then changed to "The T-Set" ("Tea Set"), then "The Meggadeaths," "The Architectural Abdabs," "The Screaming Abdabs," and simply "The Abdabs." At this point, the band's membership consisted of:


    * Roger Waters, lead guitar

    * Clive Metcalf, bass

    * Richard Wright, keyboards

    * Nick Mason, drums

    * Juliette Gale, vocals

    * Keith Noble, vocals

    The Abdabs mostly played rhythm and blues songs. Juliette later married Wright, and she, Noble, and Metcalf all quit the band. Waters then brought in Bob Close and Syd Barrett for guitars, then later Close left, leaving the original recorded Pink Floyd lineup. In late '65, they became "The Pink Floyd Sound," then just "The Pink Floyd." The name Pink Floyd came from albums by two blues artists, Pink Anderson and Floyd Council, that were in Syd Barrett's collection. It had often been said that using the name came to Syd in a vision.

    The Floyd began to attract attention in mid-1966, frequently playing such underground hangouts as The UFO Club and The Marquee Club's Spontaneous Underground. It was during this time that they made the transition from playing psychedelic R&B covers to doing their own songs; almost exclusively Syd Barrett compositions. As Floyd biographer Miles has said about this period, "The Floyd were the loudest band anyone had ever heard at that time. They were also the weirdest. They were the underground band."

    The Floyd's growing underground popularity led to a single, "Arnold Layne," released in March of 1967. It entered the British charts at #20, resulting in national media exposure for the band. Their followup single, "See Emily Play," stayed on the charts for 7 weeks, reaching #6. The Pink Floyd's first LP, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, also remained on the charts for 7 weeks, and also reached #6.

    The success that followed their first two singles and Piper proved to be too much for Syd, as the vast quantities of drugs he was taking in, the blind worship of his fans, and other factors all made him unpredictable on stage and in the studio. The other members of the group decided to bring in an additional guitarist to cover for Syd, and thus David Gilmour was asked to join the band (Jeff Beck was also considered, but the band was in awe of him, and thought he would command too high a price). Gilmour (not the same as jazz musician David Gilmore had established a reputation as a guitarist and vocalist in the group "The Jokers Wild".

    With the addition of Gilmour and Syd's declining state, it was shortly decided that the band could carry on without him, and so one night they simply didn't pick him up on the way to a show. Barrett went on to record two solo albums (with the assistance of the Floyd's members), and while he remained (and remains) a cult hero, he never achieved the musical popularity on his own that he did with the group.

    Pink Floyd, meanwhile (having shed the "The" part of their name along with Syd), went on to be fantastically successful, follwing a somewhat rough start sans Barrett. They continued as a foursome from Saucerful through Animals; it was during the Wall sessions that Rick Wright was forced out of the group (See P3Q30). By this time as well the lyrical and conceptual ambitions of Waters were clashing full on with the musical ideas of Gilmour; on the subsequent Final Cut album, Gilmour acted as essentially a session musician. At that point, it seemed impossible that they would ever work together again, and thus Pink Floyd was seen as dead. To heighten this impression, both Waters and Gilmour produced solo albums, neither of which did terribly well on the charts or as draws for the tours the two embarked on.

    In short, Waters decided to officially leave the group; Gilmour and Mason subsequently decided to record an album under the Pink Floyd name. Waters, who thought the name best layed to rest, sued them over its use.

    Waters also remained active musically, following up his first solo album, Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking, with contributions to the little known movie soundtrack, "When the Wind Blows." His next solo album was Radio KAOS, for which he again toured. Again, neither was a great success commercially; certainly not by Pink Floyd standards. Later, in 1990, he staged what was certainly one of the more memorable music "events" in recent history, with his Wall in Berlin charity concert. His most recent work, Amused to Death, was not the sales success it was hoped it would be, despite much commercial hype. This was to the great disappointment of many of his fans, who thought that AtD was his best work yet.

    Meanwhile, Pink Floyd did not die, certainly not legally, and in the minds of many fans, not in spirit either. Their first post-Waters release, A Momentary Lapse of Reason, went on to become a major success, and the 2 1/2 member Floyd followed it up with an extensive world tour. After several years off, the group, now with a full three members, released The Division Bell, and embarked on another tour.

  4. #4
    Monty
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hello Kitty
    The name Pink Floyd came from albums by two blues artists, Pink Anderson and Floyd Council

    I could have sworn they named their band after their high school quarterback Randy "Pink" Floyd...

  5. #5
    arrogance in the flesh Hello Kitty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monty
    I could have sworn they named their band after their high school quarterback Randy "Pink" Floyd...
    I think you got the name thing confused with how Lynyrd Skynyrd got their name from their highschool coach.

  6. #6
    Monty
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    Marijuana on one. Reefer on two. -- Randall "Pink" Floyd

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    geophysical Mojo bikegeek's Avatar
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    that's the funniest post all day


    Quote Originally Posted by Monty
    I could have sworn they named their band after their high school quarterback Randy "Pink" Floyd...
    Quote Originally Posted by Hello Kitty
    I think you got the name thing confused with how Lynyrd Skynyrd got their name from their highschool coach.
    I've made allies of the voices in my head..

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    arrogance in the flesh Hello Kitty's Avatar
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    Speak To Me
    Waters: "I thought the album needed some kind of overture and I fiddled around with the heartbeat, the sound effects and Clare Torry screaming until it sounded right." Waters has often said he gave the credit as a gift to Nick Mason - an account supported by Gilmour - though, after his relations with the band curdled, he came to express bitter regret for his generosity. The album's opening sound is a heartbeat fading up, an idea dating back to Pink Floyd's work on the Zabriskie Point soundtrack in 1970. Live, it would start while the auditorium lights were still on and build up over several minutes. Artistically, it seems to have done the job as a shrewdly, perhaps crudely, direct route to the pulse of any listener. But, technically, Alan Parsons, who had previously worked with Pink Floyd in more lowly roles on Atom Heart Mother and Ummagumma, recalls it with little joy because the bass drum tape loop which creates the heartbeat illusion became "rather crappy" as it passed through "a lot of tape generations" and acquired "this nasty modulation of noise".

    However, Parsons did have the satisfaction of christening the piece when, testing voice levels for the questionnaire recordings, he would habitually bark down the talkback mic, "Speak to me". The piece is a collage, developed late in the sessions. The heartbeat is eventually joined by a fast-ticking clock, a slower clock and a halfspeed clock from Time, and the intro loop from Money. The first voice heard - saying, "I've been mad for fuckingyears" - is Floyd's then road manager Chris Adamson. Then it's Jerry Driscoll announcing, "I've always been mad. I know I've been mad like the most of us have." The crazed laughter is from Peter 'Puddy' Watts, Floyd's late executive road manager, who was recorded on a previous session. A VCS3 synthesizer supplies the helicopter noise, while towards the end there is a skin-prickling build-up of two backwards chords and screams taken from Torry on The Great Gig In The Sky which accelerate and crash into Breathe's downbeat. Composer: Mason. Track sheet: Chris Adamson's madness, Jerry's madness, money, Clare scream, VCS3 buzz, faster clock, slower clock, 1/2 speed clock, heartbeat, backward chord, backward chord with echo, Peter's loony laugh, click.

    Breathe (A. K. A. Breath In the Air)
    Waters: "This is one of the pieces that developed out of the writing sessions at Broadhurst Gardens. The rundown in the chorus sounds very Rick-like and I wrote the lyrics and the top line. It's so simple, only two chords. The lyrics, starting with 'Breathe, breathe in the air, Don't be afraid to care', are an exhortation directed mainly at myself, but also at anybody else who cares to listen. It's about trying to be true to one's path." The lengthy introduction features Gilmour on what sounds like a according to the guitarist's recollection that's exactly what it was - he reckons he bought one just before recording Dark Side Of The Moon. However, Waters remembers that he improvised the lap-steel effect by playing an open-tuned Stratocaster across his knees. Whatever, the sound floats, with occasional use of volume pedal, over the bass, drums, electric piano and rhythm guitar backing track. The arrangement ensures a real feeling of space, even after organ,Leslie'd guitars and guitar swells have been added. Gilmour's lead vocals are double-tracked and he sings all the harmonies as well, the two-part chorus vocals echoing Echoes. Waters: "Dave sang Breathe much better than I could have. His voice suited the song. I don't remember any ego problems about who sang what at that point. There was a balance. You'd just say, How does that sound in your range?"

    Parsons: "The vocals would never take very long. Dave's a great singer, it would never be more than a couple of hours, except that sometimes he might give it up and come back another day."

    Composers: Waters, Gilmour, Wright.
    Track sheet: Bass, drums, rhythm guitar, vocals Dave, harmony vocals Dave, Leslie guitar, slide guitar, swells, intro organ.

    On The Run
    Waters: "This came together in the studio. What's interesting and gratifying from my point of view in trying to claim ownership of this stuff is that some of Adrian Maben's film Pink Floyd In Pompeii was shot while we were making Dark Side Of The Moon, and there's quite a long shot of me in the studio recording On The Run with.the VCS3 [a 'briefcase' model with a sequencer in the lid]. "Trying to find out how the sequencer works, I played something into it and speeded it up and out came the part. I thought, That's quite good. It added a certain tension." Gilmour has a co-writing credit, and his recollection (confirmed by Parsons) is that he first extracted an eight-note sequence from the VCS3 and Waters then got interested and replaced it with one of his own, creating one of the earliest sequences on a record - The Who's Baba O'Reilly, from1971, being generally accepted as the first notable example. Parsons: "The whole thing is live, one synthesizer played live. The click in the sound is just a recycling of the sequence that wasn't meant to be there, but it works well." Waters: "Zinovieff VCS synthesizers all had a filter driven from a VCO [oscillator] that would sweep in a very narrow band and the 'shhhhhhhhhheeee' noise is one of those filters sweeping over the basic signal." Until this version emerged, the On The Run slot was filled by various concert jams under the catch-all title of The Travel Section and, to express this area of modern day stress and strain, appropriate sound effects were laid over the VCS3 sequence. Airport noises and a final explosion came from an Abbey Road library sound effects record. The 'train' is simulated by guitar feedback. The spoken line, "Live for today, gone tomorrow", and the subsequent manic laugh came from road manager Roger The Hat after he turned over a Waters card enquiring, Do you fear death?, while Parsons came up with the footsteps. Parsons: "Often I'd carry on experimenting after they had gone. The footsteps were done by Peter James, the assistant engineer, running around Studio 2, breathing heavily and panting. They loved it when they heard it the next day."

    Composers: Waters, Gilmour.
    Track sheet: Roger the roadie, rhythm VCS3, heartbeat, swish, explosion, footsteps, VCS3 IJR main, guitar explosion, start VCS3, boom VCS3.

    Time
    Waters: "The year that we made that record was the year that I had a sudden revelation personally - which was that this was it. I had the strangest feeling growing up - and I know a lot of people share this - that childhood and adolescence and one's early adult life are preparing for something that's going to happen later. "I suddenly thought at 29, Hang on, it's happening, it has been right from the beginning, and there isn't suddenly a line when the training stops and life starts. 'No one told you when to run, You missed the starting gun.' The idea in Time is a similar exhortation to Breathe. To be here now, this is it. Make the most of it. "The song was the closest to what you could call a group collaboration. Nick had some rototoms set up in Broadhurst Gardens. We had a VCS3 doing those bass notes, and all that clicking comes off a Fender Precision bass I played, that click clock click clock." The Rototoms - shallow tom toms which are tuned to a distinct note - were difficult to record because they had to be retuned for each chord change. The clocks were added later when Parsons discovered the song's intended title. Parsons: "I had recorded them previously in a watchmaker 's shop for a quadraphonic sound demonstration record, I went in with a mobile and recorded each one separately, ticking then chiming.

    "The solos were all improvised. Dave used to play at deafening volumes and he had a guitar processor, a Hi-Fly, made by Zinovieff like the VCS3, which was used a lot for guitar sounds throughout the album. It introduced some of the distortion effects and had good phasing and ADT. [Gilmour, incidentally, is convinced he didn't use the Hi-Fly on Time.] He used Hi-Watt amps usually and occasionally Twin Reverbs, but I don't think he ever brought more than one cabinet into the studio, and then the famous Binson Echorec and a Fuzzface fuzzbox. "He wasn't particularly interested in mic placement or EQ on guitar. I would use just one microphone, about a foot away." Gilmour sang lead, with Doris Troy, Lesley Duncan, Liza Strike and Barry St John on backing vocals, which were processed through an early pitch-changing device called a Frequency Translator, built originally as a feedback avoidance unit, which was invented by Abbey Road technician Keith Atkins.

    Parsons: "These inventions were never used in the way they were intended. We made this discovery that if you fed it back into itself it made this wonderful swishing noise. "Towards the end of the recording, almost as an afterthought, the heartbeat was added to the song. This was added by Nick Mason playing along with his bass drum." Waters made a late lyric change when he introduced the phrase "Tired of lying in the sunshine" at the start of the second verse,replacing the earlier live version's "Lying supine in the sun". In the '70s and '80s it was impossible to go into a hi-fi shop to try out speakers without being played the beginning of Time - the leisurely pace of which once drew Waters to observe, "I get the feeling there was a serious lack of panic about losing the listeners' interest there." Its open sound and detailed low end perfectly demonstrated the potential of the vinyl LP, making whatever system it was played on sound more impressive.

    Composers: Mason, Waters, Wright, Gilmour.
    Track sheet: Intro: bass, Farfisa organ, Rototoms, guitar, electric piano, heartbeat, VCS3, clocks 4 tracks. Main track: bass, Farfisa organ, drums, guitar, electric piano, harmonies, vocals, girls d/t, VCS3, solo guitar, stereo solo, heartbeat, translated girls.

  9. #9
    Honky Tonk Badonkadonk! Pimpjuice's Avatar
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    is that the album you can play simultaneously with The Wizard of Oz? Supposedly the album makes strange references to the movie as it plays or something.
    Pimpjuice

    It is the lifeforce of the Pimp.
    It's the nectar of the Pimps. It courses through our veins all the time, and at some points in daily life it is at an exponential level. And at that point Pimp Nirvana has been achieved. Pachoota will fall from the sky and blowjobs will occur everywhere.
    ---------------------------------------------------

    "If you can keep your head in all this confusion...you just don't understand the situation."

  10. #10
    Monty
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    arrogance in the flesh Hello Kitty's Avatar
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    Breath Reprise
    Waters: "The decision to place Breathe Reprise after Time arose during the process of working the piece up live before we started recording." Referred to as "Home Again" during the recordings, it was simply the third verse of Breathe, detached for structural/emotional reasons.

    The Great Gig In The Sky
    Waters: "Are you afraid of dying? The fear of death is a major part of many lives, and as the record was at least partially about that, that question was asked, but not specifically to fit into this song. I don't remember whose idea it was to get Clare, in but once she sang it was great. One of those happy accidents. The slide guitar was just something that Dave was into at the time. A brilliant sound." Early tags for the piece while the concept was being developed were "The Mortality Sequence" and "Religious Theme". Early live versions incorporated taped Bible readings and a Malcolm Muggeridge speech. Based around a Rick Wright chord progression, it remained an instrumental (with some spoken inserts) until a couple of weeks before the album was finished. Parsons: "The song sounded really good even before vocals were added to it. It was recorded with Rick in Studio 1 while the rest of the band were in Studio 2. We put a little practical joke over on Rick, making him think the band were playing live when he was actually listening off tape, and when he looked up at the end of the song all of us were standing watching him from the door. They were great ones for carefully planned practical jokes."

    But eventually (Gilmour's recollection) Waters suggested trying a vocal "to make it more interesting" and Parsons suggested bringing in Clare Torry to sing over it. The resulting improvised vocals surpassed everybody's wildest expectations to provide one of the emotional high points of the record. Parsons: "I had worked on a session before with Clare and suggested that we tried her out on this track. I think one has to give Clare credit; she was just told to go in and 'do your thing', so effectively she wrote what she did. She wailed over a nice chord sequence. There was no melodic guidance at all apart from 'a bit more waily here' or 'more sombre there'. The vocal was done in one session - three hours - no time at all, then a couple of tracks were compiled for the final version." Torry was an EMI staff songwriter, straight out of school, who had just started doing a few vocal sessions: "I received a phone call to come in and do a session for Pink Floyd. It didn't mean much to me at the time, but I accepted and was booked: 7-10pm, Sunday, January 21, Studio 3. "When I arrived they explained the concept of the album to me and played me Rick Wright's chord sequence. They said, 'We want some singing on it.' But didn't know what they wanted, so I suggested going out into the studio and trying a few things. I started off using words but they said, 'Oh no, we don't want any words.' So the only thing I could think of was to make myself sound like an instrument, a guitar or whatever, and not to think like a vocalist. I did that and they loved it. "I did three or four takes very quickly, it was left totally up to me, and they said, 'Thank you very much.' In fact, other than Dave Gilmour, I had the were infinitely bored with the whole thing, and when I left I remember thinking to myself, That will never see the light of day.

    "If I'd known then what I know now I would have done something about organising copyright or publishing. I would be a wealthy woman now. The session fee in 1973 was X15, but as it was a Sunday I charged a double fee of Ł30... which I invested wisely, of course." After Jerry Driscoll's stoic rebuttal re fear of dying, comes Puddy Watts's defiantly insecure, "I never said I was frightened of dying."

    Composer: Wright.
    Track sheet: Bass, Jerry, Puddy, kit, piano, ambience, organ 2 tracks, steel 2 tracks, Clare 2 tracks.

    Recording began: June 25, 1972

    Money
    Waters: "I was just fiddling around on the bass at Broadhurst Gardens and I came up with that riff, seven beats long. The rest of the song developed after I thought, Let's make a record about the pressures that impinge upon young people in pop groups, one of which is money. "It doesn't sound to me like a song that just started to pour out of me, it doesn't feel close enough to the nature of my being, so I'm sure it was written to become specifically part of Dark Side Of The Moon. "I then thought it would be good as an introduction to create a rhythmic device using the sound of money. I had a two-track studio at home with a Revox recorder. My first wife [Judy Trim] was a potter and she had a big industrial food mixer for mixing up clay. I threw handfuls of coins and wads of torn-up paper into it. We took a couple of things off sound effects records too. "The backing track was everyone playing together, a Wurlitzer piano through a wah wah, bass, drums and that tremolo guitar. One of the ways you can tell that it was done live as a band is that the tempo changes so much from the beginning to the end. It speeds up fantastically." Parsons: "The core of the song is a bass riff with a guitar an octave apart in 7/4. It's quite magical in that you don't really notice it. The vocal is Dave; it was a quick vocal, he sung it no more than twice. "The effects loops at the start of the song were re-recorded in the studio and this took a long time. Each sound had its own loop which we had to measure, using a ruler, to keep it in time. There was a tearing paper sound, a telephone Uni selector from a sound effects tape, bags of cash literally being dropped on the studio floor and a cash register ringing. The loop itself became the click. Once we'd got the loop they went out and played to it and I faded it out in their ears. It comes back once but that's just a happy coincidence, it's actually not quite in time.

    "The track has a really good feel. They laid most of it down together, but Nick overdubbed the tom toms in the middle section. The arrangements were all worked out before, except the dynamics of the long solo when it breaks down to nothing. The solo came together in the studio but once he had it, he always replicated it note for note in concert." The first two guitar solos were played on a Stratocaster going through a Hi-Watt amp, the first being ADTed (automatically doubled) on the mix. For the third solo Gilmour switched to a Lewis guitar with a twooctave neck, making it easier to play higher notes. For the solo section Gilmour suggested changing the time signature from 7/4 into 4/4, before returning to 7/4 for the rest of the song. The sax was added late in October by Gilmour's friend from Cambridge pub jazz days, Dick Parry. Gilmour says he gave Parry the daunting instruction to play like the sax man in the cartoon band who did the theme music for Pearl k Dean's ad sequence at the cinema in those days. Like the backing vocals on Time, Parry's solo was fed through a Frequency Translator.
    Composer: Waters.
    Track sheet: Bass, drums, Wurlitzer, vocal, sax, guitar doubling bass, tremolo Kepexed guitar, guitar solo, solo ADT, money FX.

    Recording began: June 7, 1972.

  12. #12
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    Us And Them
    Waters: "Rick wrote the chord sequence for this and I used it as a vehicle. I can't remember when I wrote the top line and the lyric, but it was certainly during the making of Dark Side Of The Moon because it seems that the whole idea, the political idea of humanism and whether it could or should have any effect on any of us, that's what the record is about really - conflict, our failure to connect with one another. "The first verse is about going to war, how in the front line we don't get much chance to communicate with one another, because someone else has decided that we shouldn't. I was always taken with those stories of 'the First Christmas' in 1914, when they all wandered out into no man's land, had a cigarette, shook hands and then carried on the next day. The second verse is about civil liberties, racism and colour prejudice. The last verse is about passing a tramp in the street and not helping." Wright's instrumental track, working titled The Violence Sequence, had been recorded and submitted for Antonioni's 1970 movie Zabriskie Point as a backdrop to slow-motion riot scenes at Berkeley. The band thought it worked well, but Antonioni left it on the cutting room floor. Parsons: "The speaking voices are Jerry and Pete Watts. I remember Pete Watts's wife did the, 'That geezer was cruising for a bruising,' in response to the question, When did you last thump someone? When Henry McCullough, Wings' guitarist, was asked the same thing, he said, 'New Year's Eve.' The next question was, Were you in the right?, and he said, 'I don't know, I was drunk at the time.' His wife was also asked, When did you last thump someone? She said 'New Years Eve' too."

    Gilmour again sings the lead vocals with delayed echoes generated by using both sides of a two-track recorder running at seven and a half inches per second vari-speeded right down to give a lag of around a second and a half. On the triple-tracked backing vocals by Troy, Duncan, Strike and St John, what sounds like an effect is actually their own vibrato. The "short sharp shock" remark is Roger The Hat. This time, when Dick Parry was approaching his solo (a fixture on lists of all-time sax-in-rock greats ever since), Gilmour urged him to think of Gerry Mulligan's contributions to Gandharva (1971) by American electroadventurers Beaver And Krause - "Very breathy," he says. Waters: "The sax on this and Money is just Dick improvising with a little guidance from us - 'Breathier Dick, less breathy; more notes, less notes' - normally less notes is the deal with saxophone players."

    Composers: Waters, Wright.
    Track sheet: Bass, drums, fuzz bass, piano, organ, extra piano middle 8, original guitar, sax, vocal, vocal, girls.

    Recording began: June 1, 1972.

    Any Colour You Like
    Waters: "A little instrumental fill. Apart from the songs that are credited to one person, it's all a bit of a grey area. Money, Eclipse and Brain Damage which are credited to me were mine. Us And Them was clearly Rick's tune and I wrote the lyrics. Great Gig In The Sky was Rick's. Breathe and Any Colour You Like are grey areas and so is Time, because it was close to a real collaboration of all four members. "The distributions got divided up in strange ways afterwards because we were being very egalitarian and group-like in those days. I regret it furiously now, of course. I gave away a lot of the publishing and I wish I hadn't, but these things happen and that's how it is and that's how it will always be." Linking Us And Them and Brain Damage, this was known as "Scat" during recording. The lead instrument is a VCS3 synthesizer with a very long tape echo, backed by a tremolo guitar, bass, drums, Uni-Vibed guitar, organ and scat guitar. The final title came from Chris Adamson's catch-phrase, "You can have it any colour you like."

    Composers: Mason, Gilmour, Wright.
    Track sheet: Bass, drums, Uni-Vibe guitar rhythm, organ, scat guitar, VCS3 lead, VCS3 repeat, VCS3.

    Brain Damage
    Waters: "That was my song; I wrote that at home. The grass [as in 'The lunatic is on the grass'] was always the square in between the River Cam and Kings College chapel. I don't know why, but when I was young that was always the piece of grass, more than any other piece of grass, that I felt I was constrained to 'keep off '. I don't know why, but the song still makes me think of that piece of grass. The lunatic was Syd, really. He was obviously in my mind. It was very Cambridge-based that whole song." Brain Damage was known as "The Lunatic Song" during recording, though some sources suggest that an early version was written during the Meddle sessions in 1971 and that the song was originally called The Dark Side Of The Moon (its final line being, of course, "I'll see you on the dark side of the moon"). Parsons: "The question, Do you think you're going mad?, was asked and it was used in other parts of the album because Jerry's response was so magnificent: 'I've always been mad like the rest of us have, sometimes I don't know if I'm mad even if I'm not mad.' Something like that."

    Composer: Waters.
    Track sheet: bass, drums, heartbeat, Pete Watts laugh, guitar, organ, vocal high, vocal low, girls, silly synth, Leslie guitar, lead guitar and VCS3.

    Eclipse
    Waters: "This was interesting because it was something that I added after we'd gone on the road. It felt as if the pier.e needed an ending. It's just a run-down with a little bit of philosophising, though there's something about its na'i've quality that I still find appealing. "In a strange way it re-attaches me to my adolescence, the dreams of youth. The lyric points back to what I was attempting to say at the beginning. It's a recitatfiof the ideas that preceded it saying, There you are, that's all there is to it. What you experience is what it is. The rather depressing ending, 'And everything under the sun is in tune/but the sun is eclipsed by the moon', is the idea that we all have the potential to be in harmony with whatever it is, to lead happy, meaningful and right lives." The whole song has an uplifting feel, with Gilmour's arpeggiated Leslie guitars and Wright's organ building to a sustained crescendo before giving way to Jerry Driscoll's wisdom and a last fade to heartbeat. Waters sings lead, with Gilmour harmonising thirds and fifths and Doris Troy wailing. Waters: "I remember when Doris Troy had done her bit she said, I'm only going to charge you a hundred pounds for my thing on the end." The final words are Jerry Driscoll's. His original words were, "There is no dark side of the moon really. As a matter of fact it's all dark... and the thing that makes it look alight is the sun." His closing phrase, astronomically accurate yet artistically anticlimactic, was edited out.

    Composer: Waters.
    Track sheet: Bass, drums, guitar, organ, 1st harm, 2nd harm Roger vocal, girls, bass run, double-tracked Leslie guitar, lead guitar, Jerry at end, heartbeat.

  13. #13
    arrogance in the flesh Hello Kitty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pimpjuice
    is that the album you can play simultaneously with The Wizard of Oz? Supposedly the album makes strange references to the movie as it plays or something.
    How to Synchronize Pink Floyd and the Wizard of Oz
    So you want to try the Pink Floyd "Dark Side of the Moon" and Wizard of Oz synchronicity test? Here's are simple instructions for set up and enjoyment of these two classics.

    1. Buy or rent the movie The Wizard of Oz.
    2. Buy or rent the CD of Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon.
    3. Put the CD in the player and press pause at the beginning of track 1.
    4. Put the movie in your VCR and begin to play.
    5. Turn off the sound on your television. Turn up the volume on your CD player.
    6. When the MGM lion roars for the third time, unpause the CD.
    7. If the credit "Produced by Mervyl Leroy" appears onscreen at the transition between "Speak to Me" and "Breathe," then you are correctly synched.
    8. Sit back and enjoy!

    Tips:

    1. Use a CD, not an album. Stopping to flip the album would mess up the synchronicity.
    2. Try to think of this as one long, bizarre music video. Don't expect too much and you might be amazed.
    3. End the movie after one play-through of the CD. Avoid the "looping" method to replay the CD, as anything after this point is minor and far-fetched.

    Synchronicities to look for:

    1. When Dorothy runs away from home, the line "No one told you when to run" from the song "Time" is heard.
    2. The tornado scene begins just as "The Great Gig in the Sky" starts playing. The song lasts for the entire duration of the storm.
    3. The female singer begins moaning, her voice rising and falling in time with the mood of the tornado scene.
    4. When "Great Gig" ends, the first side of the album also ends (not valid when using a CD).
    5. "Money" begins as Dorothy opens the door and sees Oz. The black and white part of the film ends at this point and begins in color.
    6. The lyics "Don't give me that do-goody-good bullsh*t" are heard as Glinda the good witch floats down in her bubble.
    7. The dancing ballerinas seem to keep time with the rhythm in "Us and Them."
    8. "Brain Damage" becomes the backdrop for the scarecrow scene where he's singing "If I Only Had a Brain."
    9. The album ends with a heartbeat, as Dorothy presses her ear to the Tin Man's chest to listen for a heart.

  14. #14
    arrogance in the flesh Hello Kitty's Avatar
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    Pink Floyd Trivia and Random Facts

    The band was named after 2 American Blues musicians, Pink Anderson and Floyd Council.

    Pink Floyd first hit the Top Ten in 1967 with "See Emily Play", a feat that would not be repeated again until 1980's "Another Brick In The Wall".

    Pink Floyd was the first band to use a quadraphonic sound system at their concerts. Using four different channels of audio, it was an early version of surround sound.

    In the early days, Pink Floyd used slide projectors and colored condoms stretched over lights.

    After Roger Waters left the band, Pink Floyd added testicles to the inflatable pig used while on tour, which was designed by Waters, to avoid a potential lawsuit.

    "Dark Side of The Moon" spent nearly 15 years (723 weeks) in the Billboard Top 200 album charts and to date has sold 28 million copies.

    "Atom Heart Mother" was Pink Floyd's first No. 1 LP.

    Roger Waters, Rick Wright and Nick Mason formed the band when they met at a London architectural school. Syd Barrett joined them shortly after.

    In 2002, Gilmour sold his London house for $6.48 million and gave all the money to charity.

    In the movie "The Wall," the character Pink shaves off all his facial hair, including his eyebrows - something Syd Barrett once arrived to the studio having done himself.

    "Dark Side" started as a sequence called "Eclipse," most of which was developed in rehearsals for live shows.

    The ink paintings on the back cover of "Piper At the Gates Of Dawn" was drawn by Syd Barrett, based on some photographs of the band members standing behind each other.

    The album "Atom Heart Mother" got its name from an article in the newspaper about a pregnant woman with a pacemaker.

    Rick Wright's favorite Pink Floyd album is "Wish You Were Here"

    David Gilmour's car radio was used in recording the intro of the song "Wish You Were Here."

    Each performance on 1980's "The Wall" tour used 45 tons of equipment, 106 decibels of quadrophonic sound, a bomber plane, inflatables, Gerald Scarfes monstrous puppets, a fake Pink Floyd band in masks and 340 bricks erected by concealed hydraulic lifts into a 160x35ft wall.

    "Dark Side of The Moon" still sells approximately 8,000 copies a week in the U.S.

    On the last night of the 1977 "Animals In The Flesh" tour in Montreal, Roger Waters spit on a fan.

    "The Wall" was originally to have included live footage of five performances of Pink Floyd in concert at London's Earl's Court, but none of the resulting footage was deemed suitable.

    "Ummagumma" was a slang term for having sex.

    While shooting the cover for Pink Floyd's "Animals," an inflatable pig broke loose from its wires and floated into the flightpath of London's Heathrow airport.

    "Piper At the Gates Of Dawn" was recorded at Abbey Road studios while Beatles were there making "Sgt. Pepper."

    The film version of "The Wall" had its world premier at the 1982 Cannes Festival.

    "Have A Cigar's" vocals were not performed by any member of Pink Floyd -- it was Roy Harper.

    The cow-cover for "Atom Heart Mother" was chosen because the band wanted a cover that was as ordinary and unpsychedelic as possible.

    "Shine on You Crazy Diamond's" riff was made when David made a mistake on the last chord.

    The burning man on the cover of "Wish You Were Here" actually got burned because the band wanted him to be on the right side and the wind was blowing the wrong way.

  15. #15
    mel
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    Pink Floyd was my first rock concert. I saw them at the Fox theater in Atlanta when Dark Side came out. I have vague memories of coming out of the concert and seeing a light show with the prism from the album. It may have happened or maybe it was the good drugs. I love Pink Floyd, now I gotta rent Wizard of Oz and have a party. Thanks for all the trivia Kitty, however my attention span didn't allow me to read through it all.

    Mel
    Life isn't about how to survive the storm but how to dance in the rain.

    "High standards, low morals" The Brickhouse Club

  16. #16
    Mojo Poser Gerry's Avatar
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    I like Pink Floyd too but my attention span won't allow me to sit still long enough to really listen to it like I used to. Or maybe it's just the lack of drugs now that makes it sound different to me.
    I want to be a Spartan.

  17. #17
    arrogance in the flesh Hello Kitty's Avatar
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    http://members.aol.com/Rayman260/pinkroio/pfroio.html

    Rayman's Pink Floyd RoIO Collection

    The purpose of this page is to give other Floydians the chance to hear Pink Floyd RoIO's (Records of Illegitimate Origin) that they would otherwise not get the chance to hear. I have several of these hard to find recordings in my Pink Floyd collection on CD and I've decided to share them with others in Real Audio format. If you are anything like I am and crave anything by Pink Floyd that you can get your hands on then you've come to the right place. It's taken me years to accumulate the Pink Floyd material that I own and even though these recordings are not of the same quality that you would buy from the store, they are my most prized Floyd possessions. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.

  18. #18
    not my real name
    MoJo SuppoRteR
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monty
    I could have sworn they named their band after their high school quarterback Randy "Pink" Floyd...
    Yep, from my hometown.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pimpjuice
    is that the album you can play simultaneously with The Wizard of Oz? Supposedly the album makes strange references to the movie as it plays or something.
    I've done that. It worked for a while, then kinda petered out...

    I guess my favorite track from DSOTM would have to be Any Colour You Like.

    But my favorite Floyd album is Animals.
    ...and the mountains shall drop sweet wine and the hills shall melt.

  19. #19
    arrogance in the flesh Hello Kitty's Avatar
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    Dark Side of the Moon (1973)

    "There's someone in my head, but it's not me ..."

    If Pink Floyd had never recorded an album before "Dark Side of the Moon," and never recorded another after, this 1973 classic would have been more than enough to keep the band in the record books (and in the money) for years to come.

    "Dark Side," minus the final song "Eclipse," which was composed later, actually had its public debut during a series of four concerts at the Rainbow Theatre in London in February 1972, a year before the album was released, March 17, 1973, in the United States and March 24 in the U.K. (The release date seems to be in some dispute, with many claiming March 24 as the U.S. date; March 13 has also been reported as the U.S. date. The dates above are the official dates from Capitol Records. Odd, at any rate, that both the 17th and 24th fell on Saturdays in 1973!) Actually, at the time of its first public performance, the entire piece was called "Eclipse." The name was changed to "Dark Side of the Moon," even though the group Medicine Head had released an album with the same title before Floyd.

    The band's first cohesive "concept album," "Dark Side" deals with the notion of how everyday pressures of modern life can lead to madness. Interspersed throughout, are seemingly random bits of dialogue, sometimes mixed practically below the threshold of consciousness. The snippets come from a series of unrehearsed interviews the band conducted with people who happened to be at EMI's Abbey Road studio at the time. Musicians, roadies, even the doorman of the facility, were set down in front of a mic and shown flash cards with questions like, "When was the last time you were violent?" and "When was the last time you thumped someone?" Segments of their responses were sprinkled throughout the album.

    The maniacal laughter came from Roger the Hat, a road manager of another band, while it was doorman Jerry Driscoll who provided the parting shot on the album, saying, "There is no dark side of the moon, really. Matter of fact, it's all dark," as the heartbeat at the end of side two slowly fades to black. Beatle Paul McCartney was interviewed, though his thoughts weren't included on the album.

    "Dark Side" was produced by the band between June 1, 1972, and January 1973, and engineered by Alan Parsons. Parsons, like one-time Floyd producer Norman Smith, had done work with the Beatles, and would go on to found The Alan Parsons Project, a studio ensemble that had a handful of hits, and, like Floyd, employed design team Hipgnosis for many of its album covers. Parsons also would produce material for Al Stewart, Ambrosia, Paul McCartney and the Hollies.

    Parsons, who earned a weekly salary of 35 pounds per week for his role, was largely responsible for many of the sound effects, most notably the clock montage leading into "Time," on side one. He had recorded the montage to demonstrate the power of quadraphonic sound. (Floyd created a quad version of "Dark Side," as well as 1970's "Atom Heart Mother" and 1975's "Wish You Were Here.")

    The album was the group's first number one in the United States. "Money," backed with "Any Colour You Like," made it to number 13 on the Billboard singles chart in the U.S. "Us and Them," originally written as "The Violent Sequence" for the "Zabriskie Point" soundtrack but rejected by the director, was released as a 45, backed with "Time," which climbed to number 101. But it would eventually be the album's longevity more than anything else that would make it so distinctive, for Pink Floyd and the music industry as a whole.

    "Dark Side" ended up staying on the U.S. Billboard album chart for a record 15 years, a total of 724 weeks, before it dropped off July 23, 1988. While the album had periodically dropped off the chart before, only to return another week, a change in the way Billboard constructed its charts assured that this time, the album couldn't return. (In fact, "Dark Side" did have a phenomenally long consecutive run: 591 weeks from Dec. 18, 1976, to April 23, 1988.)

    It remains the forth best selling album of all time, behind Michael Jackson's "Thriller," the soundtrack to "Saturday Night Fever," and Fleetwood Mac's "Rumours." Ironically, the album was only awarded a gold record, meant to designate a half-million units sold, because it was released before Jan. 1, 1976, when the recording industry established the designation of "platinum," representing a million units sold.

    The cover, one of many for the band by Hipgnosis, is a reference to the group's reputation for amazing light shows. It was one of several the design team worked up for the group. When presented to the band, it was chosen above the others in a matter of seconds.

    When the LP gatefold is opened up — yes, LPs do have certain advantages to compact discs! — the spectrum continues on the inside of the cover, and around again to the back, eventually connecting again with the front. In this way, the design is indicative of the heartbeat that begins and ends the album, creating a cyclic pattern the Floyd would repeat on other albums, most notable "The Wall" in 1979.

    Furthermore, the pattern repeats when several LPs are opened up and placed end to end. Hipgnosis had previously used this concept of the mandala in its design of East of Eden's "New Leaf" (1971) and "Five Bridges" by The Nice in 1970. It would continue the theme in "Tales of Mystery and Imagination: Edgar Allan Poe" (1976), The Alan Parsons Project's first album.

    Incidentally, take a close look at the light defracting from the prism, and you'll notice that one color, purple, is missing. Hipgnosis's Storm Thorgerson has said the team purposefully omitted the hue because it believed it wouldn't read properly.

    The psychological effect "Dark Side" had on the band was significant. The album was a commercial and critical success, and, unsurprisingly, a tough act to follow.

    Written by Craig Bailey

  20. #20
    arrogance in the flesh Hello Kitty's Avatar
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    Formed: 1965 in Cambridge & London, England

    Years Active: 1965 through 1983 & 1987 to present

    Group's Main Members: Syd Barrett, Roger Waters, David Gilmour, Nick Mason, Rick Wright.

    Most bands do not survive if their lead singer, chief song writer and leader leaves. But for Pink Floyd, this not only happened once, but twice and still they roll on. The origins of Pink Floyd developed at Cambridge High School in England in the early sixties. Syd Barrett, Roger Waters, and David Gilmour were all friends there and talked about forming a band. But after graduation Gilmore decided to go on to art school in London as Barrett wandered around the country side.Waters meanwhile attended a architecture school in London where he met Nick Mason and Rick Wright. They formed a R&B band called Sigma 6. With Waters on guitar, Mason on the drums and Wright on keyboards, the band also consisted of bassist Clive Metcalfe and vocalist Juliette Gale (who later would marry Wright). That lineup didn't last to long as Metcalfe and Gale left and Waters switched over to bass and Bob Close came on to play lead guitar. The band's name changed several times and then Close quit. By the end of '65 Waters, Mason and Wright joined up with Barrett who would become the band's songwriter, lead guitar player and lead singer. He renamed the band Pink Floyd - in honor of blues' musicians Pinkney 'Pink' Anderson and Floyd Council.

    Under Barrett's guide Floyd would start out quite differently than the concept album kings they would later become know as. With their first two albums they were a psychedelic band. They recorded their first two song in early '66, one, Barrett's "Lucy Leave" a combo R&B & pop song that got the band some attention. They began to play the London underground with experimental light shows and instrumental feedback that was still unheard of at the time. In early 1967 they signed with EMI Records and released their first single "Arnold Layne" which didn't sound a lot like their live show but never less was a hit reaching the UK's Top 20. Their next single "See Emily Play" was a even bigger hit and reach number 6 in June of '67. Later in '67 their debut album The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn was released. The album did not contain their first two hit singles yet it became a Top Ten hit anyway. Many claimed it to be the greatest British psychedelic album other than the Beatles Sgt. Pepper's. It contained mostly Barrett penned songs that were far out experimental pop fantasies with lengthy riff-laden instrumental passages.With the album's success they began to tour, first with Jimi Hendrix. But it was during the US tour where problems with Barrett started to show up. Syd was a true gifted genius but also a step away from insanity. He was now a heavy LSD user and it started to take its toll on him. On the US tour he would start to play music out of the blue that wasn't a part of the band's set and at other gigs he would stand on stage and not play at all. In interviews he would be incoherent. In late '67 Floyd released a third single "Apples And Oranges" but two other recordings made at the time, "Vegetable Man" and "Scream Thy Last Scream", were unsuitable for release and Barrett was at this stage to wasted to finish them properly. His fellow band members knowing they were about to see the band crash if they didn't do something, hired Waters' and Barrett's old high school friend Gilmour as a fifth member in February of 1968. Gilmour was to take over the lead guitar. Plans would be for Barrett to stay in the band but not play live any longer. However the five piece Floyd didn't last long as Barrett's mental instability grew worse and he left the band just two months later. He did go on to record two somewhat successful solo albums shortly after his departure from the band but then disappeared into oblivion, his mental problems totally taking over his life.

    The new Pink Floyd would become even more of a hit. The next album Saucerful Of Secrets was still somewhat like the debut with one leftover Barrett song, "Jugband Blues", but things would be changing. Waters took over most of the writing and lead vocals and Gilmour was an excellent guitarist. The band drew 100,000 fans for a free concert they did in London in '69 and the next few albums showed a change in style with '71's Meddle getting the best of the reviews. Then in 1973 they released their masterpiece, Dark Side Of The Moon. The album would turn out to be one of music's best selling albums, staying on the Billboard chats for more than a decade, selling over 25 million copies. Waters' writing was brilliant and the stereophonic sound effects had to make this album one of the best ever to listen to while wearing headphones and smoking herb. Although Floyd had been a big hit in England for years before Dark Side Of The Moon, it was this album that now made them superstars in the US and the rest of the rock world.

    So how would the band follow up on their next album? Yes, it would take another monster effort and Waters and Company were up to it. Although it didn't sell as many copies as Moon did, 1975's Wish You Were Here was musically as great. Personally, this writer likes it even a bit more! The album's songs blended together better than any other concept album. Wish You Were Here was dedicated to Floyd's lost founder, Syd Barrett, especially the song "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" which was written entirely about him. Surprisingly during the album's recording at Abbey Road studio, Barrett showed up to pay a visit. It was the first time anyone in the band had seen him since '69 and it also would be the last time (at least to date).

    Their next album, Animals (1977) was another hit but not as well received and problems were now starting to show in the band as members weren't getting along and talk of a break-up was in the air. But in 1979 they released a double album, The Wall, it would go on to be their second biggest selling album. The tune "Another Brick In The Wall" would turn out to be their only number 1 single. But relations within the band were getting worst. Waters and Wright hadn't got along well for years and Waters insisted on the band's firing of Wright which finally took place in 1980. Gilmore meanwhile was upset with Waters for the lack of credit he was given on The Wall and Mason took Gilmore's side in the dispute. It didn't seem there would be anymore new Floyd albums as the band seemed doomed, but to everybody's surprise they released The Final Cut in 1983. Truth being, the album was more a solo project for Waters as Gilmore and Mason had little to do with it. Also with Wright gone now, little of the electronic innovation which was so typical on their previous albums showed on this one. The album was a disappointment to many. Shortly after its release the band split up. All the members did some solo albums and then in 1986 Gilmore and Mason decided to reform the band. Waters was totally against the whole deal claiming without him there could be no Pink Floyd and he went to court to stop his former band mates. He lost and in '87 Gilmore and Mason joined up once again with Wright for the new Floyd. That year they released the album A Momentary Lapse Of Reason which once again sounded like the old Pink Floyd. With a bunch of session players helping out, this album may not have been as great as past Floyd albums, but still it was a good album. The band then hit the road for a successful worldwide tour and the next year the live album Delicate Sound Of Thunder was a hit. The next studio album, 1994's The Division Bell was a full group effort and once again held the band's true sound. In '95 they released yet another double live album, Pulse which was well received by fans. Meanwhile Waters remained bitter towards his former mates and his solo career seems to be stalled. The last word on Barrett is that he's institutionalized in poor health.

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